No more butts: biodegradable filters a step to boot litter problem.

 

Robertson, R, W Thomas, J Suthar and D Brown. 2012.  Accelerated degradation of cellulose acetate cigarette filters using controlled-release acid catalysis. Green Chemistry http://ds.doil.org/10.1039/C2GC16635F.

 


Synopsis by Marty Mulvihill and Wendy Hessler, Aug 14, 2012

Context

Every year over 6 trillion cigarettes are manufactured globally. Approximately 99 percent have a filter tip. After the cigarette is smoked, the used filter is called a butt and is thrown out. When littered, cigarette butts often take years to break down.

Most filters are made using cellulose acetate fibers. More than 2 billion pounds of cellulose acetate is produced every year to meet the world demand for filters. To make it, acetic anhydride is added to cellulose fibers made from wood or cotton. The reaction creates a type of plastic that provides a stronger, more rigid filter.

By itself, cellulose fibers degrade naturally in the environment. Cellulose acetate plastic degrades very slowly.

The slow degradation, along with indoor smoking bans, mean increasingly large numbers of cigarette butts are found in public places, including parking lots, parks and beaches every year. Cigarette waste is the number one reported item collected during beach clean-ups, according to the Ocean Conservancy. In some coastal towns as many as 1 in 10 cigarette butts end up polluting the waterways.

The discarded butts are more than just an eyesore. The filters contain chemical residue from the tobacco. The residue can be toxic to marine animals. Cigarette butts are commonly found in the stomachs of dead shore birds.

One way to decrease the litter would be to create cigarette filters that degrade quickly. Previous attempts used plant-based products like cornstarch, hemp, flax or cotton. One brand of biodegradable filter, Greenbutts, incorporates plant seeds that would germinate after disposal. To date, cigarette manufacturers have not widely adopted alternative filters.

The demand for degradable filters may increase as states – including New York – consider levying taxes on non-biodegradable cigarette filters. In response, there is renewed interest to make cigarette filters degrade faster.

What did they do?

A group of chemists wondered if a cellulose acetate plastic filter could be converted back into natural, degradable cellulose after it was used. If so, the cigarette butts should degrade much more quickly.

They guessed that small amounts of acid added to the filter should speed the degradation process.

First, they measured the degradation rate of cellulose acetate using a wide range of acids with different strengths. Combinations of acids were also tested to find which worked best to make cigarette filters that retained their structure and function while degrading faster.

Next, they created an effective additive based on which acids worked best. The additive needed to be acidic, non-toxic and allow the cigarette to burn normally. To find one, they looked to acids common in food, including citric acid, phytic acid and vitamin C (ascorbic acid), as well as stronger mineral acids not commonly considered safe food additives.

The new filter design was tested. A smoking machine “smoked” the cigarettes, and the butts were left outside and monitored.

What did they find?

In the first tests, the butts exposed to water and a small amount of acid broke down faster than those not exposed to acid. Strong acids worked best to efficiently speed the degradation of the cellulose acetate fibers. In particular they found that sulfuric acid was the most effective catalyst.

Sulfuric acid, however, is not safe to put into cigarette filters. The researchers devised a way to generate the stronger acid only after the cigarette was smoked. The smoker would not be exposed to any additional harmful compounds, and the filter would degrade more quickly.

To make the acid additive, the researchers combined safer chemicals – cellulose sulfate, citric acid and phytic acid – into a tablet. When the tablet got wet, these ingredients mixed and released small amounts of sulfuric acid that degraded the filter material. The tablets were coated with ethyl cellulose and cellulose acetate to shield the acid precursors from premature exposure to water.

After 14 days outside, the butts containing the acid tablet were more acidic and tested positive for the presence of sulfuric acid, while the control butts remained unchanged. At the end of the 90-day trial, the new filters were considerably more degraded than the controls. Unfortunately they had not degraded as much as expected based on the laboratory experiments.

What does it mean?

Small amounts of strong acid increase the degradation rate of the cellulose acetate fibers found in cigarette butts. Although the idea worked in principle, the outside trials did not live up to the promise of the laboratory results.

The research is important because it is a step towards making a truly degradable and functional cigarette filter. This research shows how green chemistry can improve existing technology. The researchers designed the new filters for degradation while making safer chemical choices. This approach will ultimately minimize waste and hopefully prevent some of the toxic exposures to birds and other wildlife.

Under laboratory conditions, the acid converted the filter plastic into a biodegradable material within 30 to 60 days, depending on temperature. The food grade acids and materials generated the strong acid only after the cigarette had been smoked. These preliminary results indicate that acidic additive in the filter could reduce the time it takes for cigarette butts to degrade in the environment.

Several problems will need to be resolved before large manufacturers could adopt the use of acid tablets in cigarette filters. The filter’s effectiveness – improved degradation and materials safety of materials – will need to be quantified in clinical and environmental trials. This will take more research to design and incorporate the acid precursors into the filter body.

Cost and performance are also issues. The acid materials must be incorporated into cigarettes at a low cost without harming the performance of the product.

Researchers will llkely pursue this technology as well as other approaches to a biodegradable cigarette filter in an effort to reduce cigarette butt litter.

Resources

Clean Virginia Waterways and Longwood University. 2012. Cigarette butt litter. http://www.longwood.edu/cleanva/cigarettelitterhome.html.

Novotny, T, K Lum, E Smith, V Wang, and R Barnes. 2009. Cigarettes butts and the case for an environmental policy on hazardous cigarette waste. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph6051691.

Ocean Conservancy. A rising tide of ocean debris, International Coastal Clean-up 2009 Report. http://www.oceanconservancy.org/pdf/A_Rising_Tide_full_lowres.pdf.

Register, K. 2000. Cigarette butts as litter: Toxic as well as ugly. Underwater Naturalist: Bulletin of the American Littoral Society http://www.longwood.edu/CLEANVA/ciglitterarticle.htm.